Scent DNA is Valuable Tiger Conservation Tool

Tiger with cubs drinking water

Photo by metalmaus

New Scent DNA Used For Tiger Conservation

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Time To End Live Tiger Cub Mascot Tradition

tiger cub image

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Amur Tiger Father Leads Family Through Snow

tiger family photo

Adult Male tiger leading mother and three cubs in Russia. Photo by: WCS, Sikhote-Alin Biosphere Reserve, and Udegeiskaya Legenda National Park

First Ever Photos of Adult Male Amur Tiger with Family

A camera trap placed in the bitterly cold Russian forest snapped images of tigers. At first this might not sound so unusual, but captured on the camera were images of an adult male Amur tiger leading what is thought to be his family, a female and three cubs, through the snow. These images  are the first ever documenting a father Amur tiger with a mother and cubs.

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The Amur Tiger’s Cinderella Story

Amur tiger in snow

Photo courtesy of National Geographic

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Save Sumatran Tigers When You Shop the Frog

Kroger coffee tiger and gracey

Shop the Frog to Save Sumatran Tigers

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Amur Tigers Have Adapted for the Cold. Your Cat Has Not!

The Amur Tiger Adapted to Survive Harsh Cold WintersSiberian tiger in snow

The Amur tiger, you might know this cat by the name Siberian tiger, lives in the coniferous, scrub oak and birch woodlands of the Primorsky Krai region of the Russia far east.
This tiger has adapted to live in a the harsh cold climate where extreme cold temperatures and deep snow are common.
  • Their large size, the biggies cats in the world, allows them to conserve heat better than their smaller cousins living in Sumatra.
  • The Amur tiger has a layer of fat on its belly and flanks to protect them from the bitter cold.
  • This tigers fur is thick and long providing protection from freezing cold during the winter months.
  • Their paws have extra fur that protects them like wearing snow boots from the snow and ice.

Your Cat Has Not Adapted to Survive the Harsh Winter

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3 Simple Things You Can Do to Help Save Wild Tigers

The tiger (Panthera tigris)  is the world’s most favorite animal according to a survey carried out by Animal Planet. This poll of more than 50,000 people in 73 countries chose the tiger, the world’s largest and most threatened with extinction of the big cats.  When asked to explain the overwhelming appeal of the tiger, Dr. Candy d’Sa, an animal behaviorist, said: “We can relate to the tiger, as it is fierce and commanding o the outside, but noble and discerning on the inside.”

The tiger’s win was greeted with hope by conservationists because if people are choosing the tiger as their favorite animal, they surely  will do what is needed to ensure their survival.  But the tiger has vanished from 93% of their historic range.  And down from 100,000 wild tigers 100 years ago to fewer than 3,200 remain in the wild today. Will we do what is needed to endure the tiger’s survival?  Here are 3 simple tings you can do to help save wild tigers.

1) Tissue Products are Pushing Sumatran Tigers to Local Extinction

WWF Tiger and Toilet Paper

The toilet paper on your grocery store shelves may have a direct impact on the 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild. Image courtesy of WWF. Please buy only FSC- certified and recycled fiber paper products.

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Global Tiger Day ONE Thing You Can Do to Save our Big Cats

Tigers Today on Global Tiger Day

Gracey's Promise to Tiger

Gracey’s Promise

The Tiger (Panthera tigris) is our world’s largest cat and is also the cat most threatened with extinction.  Just 100 years ago, there were as many as 100,000 wild tigers living in Asia but today fewer than 3,200 remain.

We have already lost three of the subspecies to extinction in the last 80 years; the Javan, last recorded in the 1970’s, the Caspian, lost in the 1950’s and the Bali lost in the 1930’s. Of the six remaining,  the South China subspecies is thought to be extinct in the wild. There have been no signs of this tigers in the wild over the last 10 years.  The Bengal, Indochinese, Sumatran, Siberian and Malayan are the only remaining   wild tigers and are fighting to survive in just 7% of their historic range. Tigers only live in 13 Asian countries now having gone extinct in 11 countries already.

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Amur Tiger Leaves Forest to Ask Humans for Help

Amur Tiger Seeks Help from Humans

Amur Tiger  National Geographic

Image of Amur Tiger from National Geographic

In the Russian Far East Primorye, a young Amur tiger left the forest with an illegal poachers trap grasping his paw. The weakened tiger was crying out from the pain as he entered the village. The tiger appeared to be asking for help as he walked from place to place and  didn’t seem interested in returning to the forest.

Paw Caught in a Trap

Local hunters,  came to the aid of the young male, thought to be about one year of age, by calling on the police and forest rangers for their assistance.  The tiger was humanely  captured and the trap was successfully removed from his paw. Local  experts think the tiger accidentally got caught in a trap set for a much smaller animal.  The lure of the bait in the trap was too hard for the tiger to resist.

Get Well Soon!

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Performing Lions and Tigers Escape the UK Circuses


Circuses End Performing Lions and Tigers in the United Kingdom

Gracey in Circus Wagon distance

Gracey, The Tiniest Tiger reminding us to not allow big cats to be confined in circus wagons.

Big changes are underway under the Big Top in the United Kingdom.  Traveling circuses have started their season but for the first time no circus will be entertaining the crowd with performing big cats.  The Great British Circus was the last show to feature tigers doing tricks and they sent their cats to an operator in Ireland just in time before the new animal welfare regulations became active last month.

The Victorian era ushered in circuses with performing elephants, lions and tigers on tour.  The last time  the circuses toured  without exotic animals was around 1768 when the first modern circus entertained the spectators with horses and riders performing daring feats.  Wild animals did not debut in the circus until after the British empire expanded in the 19th century.  Wild animals were captured and brought back to be put on display at a time when the average person had little chance of seeing a live lion, tiger or elephant let alone watch them performing tricks.

Over the last couple hundred years, our world is a very different place.  We have access to learning about and seeing lions, tigers and elephants from many sources, whether that be a zoological park, a sanctuary, learning via the internet or nature programs on television.  We also know more about the big cats that share our world and most people are concerned about how they are treated and find physical abuse unacceptable in modern society.

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