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Tell Ohio It’s Time to Ban Dangerous Exotic Animals

GraceyYesterday, not too far from my habitat, innocent animals that had been living in deplorable conditions were set free from their cages and their owner was found dead on the farm where he kept these animals. The media began reporting that lions and tigers and bears were on the loose in Muskingum County.  But the truth was that most of these animals were still nearby their habitats. I bet they were frightened and confused.

In total there were 56 animals. 48 were killed right away:  18 tigers, 17 lions, 6 black bears,  3 mountain lions, 2 grizzly bears, 1 baboon and 1 wolf.  While many were criticizing the Sheriff’s department for putting the animals down, with only one hour of daylight left, and the possibility of  large carnivores escaping into the night, the Sheriff did the best that he could do. The safety of people in the surrounding area had to come first.

The Columbus Zoo was able to transport  3 leopards, 2 monkeys, and 1 grizzly bear.  For a period of time the news reported that only 1 grizzly bear, 1 mountain lion and 1 monkey were still on the loose but last report in, all the animals have been accounted for; 50 animals dead and 6 being cared for by the capable staff at our Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

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Tigers! You Can Help. Most Important Action in 10 years.

Tigers! New Rules! You Can Help!

Camouflaged among the pages of the Federal Register/Vol. 76, No. 162/ Monday, August 22, 2011/ Proposed Rules, pages 52297-52301, hidden between pages and pages of proposed rules,  the most important action to SAVE TIGERS in over 10 years is waiting for your support by just leaving a comment before September 21, 2011.

Amur Tiger Columbus Zoo

Siberian Tiger Photo credit: Joanne McGonagle

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service propose to amend the regulations that implement the Endangered Species Act by removing inter-subspecific crossed or generic tiger (Panthera tigris)(i.e.,specimens not identified or identifiable as members of Bengal, Sumatran, Siberian or Indochinese subspecies from the list of species that are exempt from registration under the Captive-bred Wildlife (CBW) regulations.” To read the entire proposal, click here.

Don’t be overwhelmed when you see the words crammed on the pages. All you need to do is leave a comment in your own words. Simply say you are FOR the new rule rescinding the generic tiger exemption.  That is all you have to say and you will have done an amazing thing towards saving our big cat cousins.  It will only take about 30 seconds and it doesn’t cost a penny.  Won’t you please help? Click Here for the Comment form.

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Keep Wildlife in the Wild Week June 20-24

Born Free USA’s third annual Keep Wildlife in the Wild Week, June 20-24 was started with the goal of taking care of wild animals not just around the world but in your own back yards!  Adam Roberts, executive vice president of Born Free USA, says the goal of Keep Wildlife in the Wild Week, is to get people to stop, think and take action.

Small steps can lead up to making a big difference. In my backyard, you might already know that we  try our best to take care of Bossy Backyard Blue Jay and all of the birds that gather and live around our habitat.  We provide food and water, and we have trees and shrubs for shelter. We are also super lucky to have squirrels, rabbits, opossum, white tail deer, the occasional raccoon and last winter there might even have been a bobcat track through our yard. We  live in an area surrounded by neighbors that love wildlife as much as we do.

What isn’t so lucky is the wild tiger.  There are more wild tigers in captivity in the United States than there are in the wild.  Occupying a mere 6% of their original territory, the tiger faces the possibility of following the pug marks of the ghosts of the Balinese, Caspian and Javan subspecies into extinction. The South China subspecies is already extinct in the wild. The remaining, Amur (Siberian), Bengal, Indo-Chinese (including Malayan), and Sumatran subspecies only have an estimated 1000 breeding females in total.

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