Living a Greener Lifestyle #PawNatural

Annie with Trees in background [Read more…]

3 Simple Things You Can Do to Help Save Wild Tigers

The tiger (Panthera tigris)  is the world’s most favorite animal according to a survey carried out by Animal Planet. This poll of more than 50,000 people in 73 countries chose the tiger, the world’s largest and most threatened with extinction of the big cats.  When asked to explain the overwhelming appeal of the tiger, Dr. Candy d’Sa, an animal behaviorist, said: “We can relate to the tiger, as it is fierce and commanding o the outside, but noble and discerning on the inside.”

The tiger’s win was greeted with hope by conservationists because if people are choosing the tiger as their favorite animal, they surely  will do what is needed to ensure their survival.  But the tiger has vanished from 93% of their historic range.  And down from 100,000 wild tigers 100 years ago to fewer than 3,200 remain in the wild today. Will we do what is needed to endure the tiger’s survival?  Here are 3 simple tings you can do to help save wild tigers.

1) Tissue Products are Pushing Sumatran Tigers to Local Extinction

WWF Tiger and Toilet Paper

The toilet paper on your grocery store shelves may have a direct impact on the 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild. Image courtesy of WWF. Please buy only FSC- certified and recycled fiber paper products.

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Tigers or Toilet Paper? You Don’t Have to Choose.

WWF Tiger and Toilet Paper

“The toilet paper on your grocery store shelves may have a direct impact on the 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild.” Image courtesy of WWF. Please buy only FSC- certified and recycled-fiber paper products

The green dense rain forests on the Indonesian island of Sumatra are the only place in the entire world where elephants, tigers, rhinos and orangutans live together.  But, since 1985, Sumatra has lost over half of its forest to the pulp and paper and palm oil industries. With only an estimated 400  Sumatran tigers left in the wild, we must all stand together to protect the last remaining habitat for our big cousins.

The World Wildlife Federation, (WWF) hunted down the connection between the United States toilet paper and tissue products and the destruction of tropical forests on the other side of the world.  What WWF found out is that the end products from the deforestation of the Sumatran forests are showing up on the United States supermarket shelves and in restaurants, hotels, schools and homes.

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